Archive for category Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique: General Articles

Abstract

Objective:

To describe the resolution of the neck and shoulder pain and associated neuropathy and the improvements in spinal range of motion (ROM) and quality of life (QoL) in a 75-year-old female receiving chiropractic care for vertebral subluxation.

Clinical Features:

A 75-year-old female presented with a history of neck and shoulder pain lasting more than 20 years. She had insomnia, intermittent low back pain and was taking codeine on a regular basis. Postural alterations and reduction in cervical spine ROM were found in conjunction with vertebral subluxation throughout the spine. She had moderate degenerative changes present on x-ray.

Interventions & Outcomes:

Chiropractic care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique was provided for vertebral and extremity subluxations. The patient demonstrated subjective physical improvements in mobility, an improvement from 5/10 to 8/10 in perceived physical health and improved self-rated QoL, and objective improvement in posture and in measured cervical spine ROM ranging from 10% to 43.7%.

Conclusion:

Chiropractic care for vertebral subluxation was associated with resolution of the patient’s presenting musculoskeletal complaints and resultant improvement in the quality of life. More research is needed to investigate the role chiropractors may play in helping older adults with maintaining an active lifestyle.


Author information: Nick Ujdur, DipAppSc, DC & David G Russell BSc (Psych), DC, Cert TT

 

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Abstract

Objective:

To describe the resolution of low-grade sensory polyneuropathy and the improvements in spinal function in a 63-year-old male receiving Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (AMCT) to correct vertebral subluxation.

Clinical features:

A 63-year-old male with a 4-year history of bilateral lower limb sensory polyneuropathy, previously diagnosed by nerve conduction testing. Postural alterations, moderate reduction in cervical and lumbar range of motion (ROM), and positive sensory changes were found in conjunction with vertebral subluxation throughout the spine and moderate lumbar degenerative changes present on x-ray.

Results:

Chiropractic care using AMCT was provided for the correction of vertebral and extremity subluxations. The patient demonstrated subjective improvements in sensation in the lower limb, and objective improvement in posture, in measured spinal ROM, neurological assessment and a reduction in vertebral subluxation.

Conclusion:

A course of chiropractic care using AMCT was associated with resolution of lower limb sensory polyneuropathy, improvement in objective posture, spinal ROM and neurological assessment with reduction in vertebral subluxation. More research is needed to investigate the role chiropractors may play in helping similar patients so as to inform clinical practice and future higher-level research designs


Chiropr J Australia 2017;45:217-228
Author information: David Russell, BSc (Psych), BSc (Chiro), Cert TT

Full Text Article

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Abstract

Objective:

To describe the attitudes and perceptions of patients introduced to chiropractic through public spinal screening, prior to and following a course of chiropractic care focused on the correction of vertebral subluxation.

Methods:

Individuals receiving care at a chiropractic teaching clinic, after exposure to a public spinal screening were surveyed regarding their attitudes and beliefs about chiropractic care. Along with socio-demographic information (i.e., gender, age by decade), the respondents were asked their opinion on the effectiveness of chiropractic care, prior to and post commencement of care. Additionally, the respondents were asked what other health benefits they experienced beyond alleviation of their presenting complaint.

Results:

A total of 94 respondents (47% male, 53% female) were surveyed, with the largest group of respondents (42%) being between 31-50 years old. Respondent perceived effectiveness of chiropractic care for their presenting complaint, prior to and after a trial of care, was indicated by 65% and 94% respectively. Additional benefits beyond the presenting complaints were reported by 90% of respondents. Reported benefits included improvement in digestion; energy; less stress; improved toilets habits; improved sleep; improved sense of wellbeing; improved respiration, improved strength, improvements in exercise, improvement in state of mind and increased physical stamina.

Conclusion:

This study suggests that in this sample, patient perceived effectiveness of chiropractic care was beyond relief of musculoskeletal symptoms only. Furthermore, this sample may not have chosen to seek chiropractic care without the exposure from the public spinal screening.


Chiropr J Australia 2017;45:1-15

Author information: David Russell, Tanja Glucina, Alice Cade, Matthew Sherson, Joel Alcantara. New Zealand College of Chiropractic, Auckland, New Zealand.

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Abstract Objective: To describe the impact of therapeutic nihilism on the elderly population, and the improvements in spinal range of motion (ROM) and mobility in a 75-year-old male receiving chiropractic care to correct vertebral subluxation. Clinical Features: A 75-year-old male presented with a 20-year history of low back and neck pain more recently managed with […]

Abstract

Objective:

To describe the impact of therapeutic nihilism on the elderly population, and the improvements in spinal range of motion (ROM) and mobility in a 75-year-old male receiving chiropractic care to correct vertebral subluxation.

Clinical Features:

A 75-year-old male presented with a 20-year history of low back and neck pain more recently managed with over-the-counter medication. Postural alterations and significant reduction in regional spinal ROM were found in conjunction with vertebral subluxation throughout the spine.

Intervention & Outcomes:

Chiropractic care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique was provided for the correction of vertebral and extremity subluxations. The patient demonstrated subjective physical improvements in mobility, an improvement from 4/10 to 8/10 in perceived physical health and objective increases in measured regional spinal ROM ranging from 7.1% to 81.8%. Reduction in dysponesis and dysautonomia were also noted through sEMG and thermal scanning.

Conclusion:

Chiropractic care to correct vertebral subluxation was associated with improvements in the patient’s presenting musculoskeletal complaints and resultant quality of life. More research is needed to investigate the role chiropractors may play in helping older adults with maintaining an active lifestyle.


A. of Vertebral Subluxation Research ~ September 12, 2016 ~ Pages 92-96

Author information: David G Russell BSc (Psych), BSc (Chiro), Cert TT

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ABSTRACT:

Objective:

To describe the presentation, care, and outcomes of an 89-year-old male experiencing medically-diagnosed chronic daily tension-type headaches, episodic migraines and co-existing musculoskeletal neck and arm pain.

Clinical Features:

The patient had long-term, medically-diagnosed chronic daily tension-type headaches, frequent migraines, and chronic right arm and neck pain related to a blast injury suffered during an artillery bombardment in World War 2 and 2 severe motor vehicle accidents experienced during the 1950’s and 1960’s.

Intervention and Outcome:

The patient received chiropractic care utilizing the Torque Release Technique and Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique for a 1-year period. After 12 weeks, the patient’s daily headaches, episodic migraines and chronic arm and neck pain had completely resolved.

Conclusion:

An 89-year-old male experiencing chronic headaches, arm and neck pain reported significant symptomatic improvements while receiving Torque Release Technique and Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique chiropractic care. Further research is required to better understand the efficacy and effectiveness of these chiropractic techniques when caring for older patients with musculoskeletal conditions.


Chiropr J Australia 2016;44(2):176-186.

Author information: Luscombe SL, McCormick J, Haavik H, Holt K. New Zealand College of Chiropractic.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the changes in mobility, emotional status, and quality of life in an 82 year old female with bilateral osteoarthritis of the knees who was receiving chiropractic care.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

An 82 year old female presented to a chiropractor with lack of mobility and function due to chronic osteoarthritis of the knees bilaterally, and degenerative disc disease and postural alterations through the lumbar spine. Associated emotional stress was also of concern as a contributor to impaired quality of life.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:

Chiropractic care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique was provided for the correction of vertebral and extremity subluxations. The patient demonstrated physical improvements in mobility and RAND36 assessment revealed an improvement in her Physical Component Summary score of 11.65. Emotional wellbeing improvements were also found by using both RAND36 and PHQ-4 assessments.

CONCLUSION:

Chiropractic care was associated with improvements in the patient’s presenting complaints and quality of life. More research is needed to investigate the role chiropractors may play in helping older adults with conditions associated with aging.


A Vertebral Subluxation Res. September 17, 2015, pp 157-162.

Author information: Dipal Patel DipAppSc, David Russell B.S.c (Psych) B.S.c (Chiro).  New Zealand College of Chiropractic, 6 Harrison Rd, Mt Wellington, Auckland 1060, New Zealand.

 

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objectives of this study were to determine the ability of several commercial shockwave devices to achieve a desired thrust profile in a benchtop setting, determine the thrust profile in a clinical analog, and determine the influence of operator experience level on device performance.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:

We conducted two different types of testing: (1) bench testing to evaluate the devices themselves, and (2) clinical equivalent testing to determine the influence of the operator.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicated a significant dependence of thrust output on the compliance of the test media. The Activator V-E device matched the ideal half-sine thrust profile to 94%, followed by the Impulse device (84%), the Activator IV/FS (74%), and the Activator II (48%). While most devices deviated from the ideal profile on the return path, the Impulse device exhibited a secondary peak. Moreover, the Activator V-E device provided evidence that the device performs consistently despite operator experience level.This has been a major concern in manual spinal manipulation. Based on our results, a hyper-flexible spine would receive a lower peak thrust force than a hypo-flexible spine at the same power setting. Furthermore, a hand-held operation further reduced the peak thrust force as it increased the system compliance. However, that influence was dissimilar for the different devices. Although controlled clinical trials are needed to determine the correlation between thrust profile and clinical outcome, already ongoing clinical studies indicate an improved patient satisfaction due to reduced treatment pain when devices are used with a thrust characteristic closer to an ideal sine wave.


Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 42, No. 12, December 2014 ( 2014) pp. 2524–2536 DOI: 10.1007/s10439-014-1115-4

Author information: Liebschner, Michael A. K.; Chun, Kwonsoo; Kim, Namhoon; and Ehni, Bruce

Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; Research Service Line, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA;  Exponent Failure Analysis, Houston, TX, USA;  Department of Pediatrics Cardiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; and Neurosurgery Service Line, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA

In Vitro Biomechanical Evaluation of Single Impulse and Repetitive

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There are two important questions every chiropractor should ask, no matter what stage of your career: how safe and effective is the adjusting instrument you are using? And, is the method you are using to find a subluxation validated by research?

These two questions go straight to the heart of our integrity as a profession and are critical to building, preserving and maintaining your own practice and reputation.
Activator recently experienced the power of these questions first-hand as we sought and received approval for the use of Activator instruments in Australia. Licensure of adjusting instruments in that country is handled by the Therapeutic Goods Administration, and among their very first requests of us was for data that would show the safety and effectiveness of the Activator.

I’ve often said that research will save the day, and that maxim has proven to be true once again. Activator forwarded to the TGA a 1985 paper, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), answering these specific queries. Activator passed muster with flying colors.

Here in the United States and around the world, Activator bases its success on research. We recently published our twenty-fifth clinical trial. You can read an assortment of Activator research by visiting our website at http://www.activator.com/research/. To our knowledge, no other adjusting instrument on the market today – besides the Activator – has any clinical trials supporting effectiveness. It is worth noting that a study about a specific instrument does not automatically apply to all other instruments. That’s something like publishing a study about a particular drug, then attempting to use it to make claims about similar drugs that were never tested. Once again, my advice is to put your faith in solid research.

Another question posed frequently is whether research validates techniques for locating a subluxation with specific testing. The paper entitled Review of Methods Used by Chiropractors to Determine the Site for Applying Manipulation by Triano et.al. in Chiropractic and Manual Therapies 2013, 21:36 (http://www.chiromt.com/content/21/1/36) is a comprehensive evaluation of how chiropractors assess a patient and know where to manipulate. You will be quite surprised to see what is supported by the evidence and what is not.

As chiropractors, we have a tendency to run from one new piece of equipment to another, sometimes spending a great deal of money, without asking these simple questions. I hope these musings convince not only the veteran field practitioner but also the new student, to make informed decisions on the adjusting instruments and methods of analysis they will use to determine safety and effectiveness for their own patients.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this article is to report the response of chiropractic care of a geriatric veteran with degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

A 74-year-old man presented with low back pain (LBP) and loss of feeling in his lower extremities for 3 months. The LBP was of insidious onset with a 10/10 pain rating on the numeric pain scale (NPS) and history of degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hypertrophy. Oswestry questionnaire was 44% and health status questionnaire was 52%, which were below average for his age. The patient presented with antalgia and severe difficulty with ambulation and thus used a walker.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:

Chiropractic care included Activator Methods protocol. Two weeks into treatment, he reported no back pain; and after 4 treatments, he was able to walk with a cane instead of a walker. The NPS decreased from a 10/10 to a 0/10, and his Revised Oswestry score decreased from 44/100 to 13.3/100. His Health Status Questionnaire score increased 25 points to 77/100, bringing him from below average for his age to above average for his age. Follow-up with the patient at approximately 1 year and 9 months showed an Oswestry score of 10/100 and a Health Status Questionnaire score of 67/100, still above average for his age.

CONCLUSION:

The findings in this case study showed that Activator-assisted spinal manipulative therapy had positive subjective and objective results for LBP and ambulation in a geriatric veteran with degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.


J Chiropr Med. 2012 Dec;11(4):293-9. [PMID:23843763]

Author information: Roberts JA, Wolfe TM. Chiropractor, Private Practice, HealthQuest Chiropractic, Farmington, ME.


Free PMC Article

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