Archive for category Pediatrics

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study is to review the available literature that describes forces of the most commonly used chiropractic techniques for children.

METHODS:

Review of the English-language literature using search terms Chiropract* and technique, protocol, or approach in databases PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Allied and Complementary Medicine, and Index to Chiropractic Literature and direct contact with authors of articles and book chapters.

RESULTS:

Eleven articles that discussed the 7 most commonly used pediatric chiropractic techniques and the forces applied were identified. Chiropractic techniques reviewed described forces that were modified based on the age of the patient. Force data for mechanically assisted devices were varied, with the minimum force settings for some devices outside the age-specific safe range recommended in the literature when not modified in some way.

CONCLUSION:

This review found that technique selection and application by chiropractors treating infants and young children are typically modified in force and speed to suit the age and development of the child.


J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2016 Jul-Aug;39(6):401-10. [PMID: 27346861]

Author information: Todd AJ, Carroll MT, Mitchell EK. Private Practice, Sale, Australia.


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Abstract

Objective:

To review the outcome of chiropractic care in the case of a fifteen-year-old female with a history of concussion.

Clinical Features:

A fifteen-year-old female presented with constant pain on the top of her head, headache, and difficulty concentrating after being hit on the head by the trunk door of a van. She was diagnosed with a concussion nine days after her initial injury. Two weeks after the diagnosis she sought out chiropractic care for her symptoms.

Intervention and Outcome:

The patient was given specific spinal adjustments using the Activator technique. After 9 adjustments the patient showed improvement in her symptoms and was tested with the ImPACT concussion test. The patient’s cognitive efficiency index improved from 0.28 (pre injury) to 0.43 (after  9 adjustments).

Conclusion:

This case report reviews the benefits of chiropractic care in the management of a patient with concussion. Further research is required to better understand how chiropractic adjustments can help patients suffering from concussion


J of Ped, Maternal & Family Health 2014 Sep 30; 60-64.

Author information: Jean-Marc Slak DC – Private Practice of Chiropractic, Burlington, MA, Kyle Price, DC – Private Practice of Chiropractic, Simpsonville, SC.


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Abstract

Objective:

To describe the results from chiropractic care of a patient presenting with a breech pregnancy using the Webster Technique analysis with Activator Adjusting Instrument thrust.

Clinical Features:

A 30 year old woman in her 34th week of pregnancy with her second child presented for a regular chiropractic visit after having an ultrasound that determined the baby was in a breech position. She had a previous cesarean section and was continuing chiropractic care with hopes of avoiding another cesarean section.

Intervention and Outcome:

Webster Technique was used to analyze the patient and a light force adjusting instrument (Activator Adjusting Instrument) was used to administer an adjustment. Trigger point therapy was also performed according to Webster protocol. After three adjustments, the fetus moved from a breech position to a normal vertex or head down position.

Conclusion:

Webster Technique protocol while using the Activator Adjusting Instrument along with trigger point therapy was successful in decreasing sacral subluxation and the fetus assumed a normal vertex position according to a follow-up ultrasound.


Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health – Chiropractic ~ Volume 2012 ~ Issue 3 ~ Pages 66-68.

Author information: Miranda Abbott, DC. Private practice, Appleton, Wisconsin, USA.

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Abstract:

Objective:

The purpose of this article is to describe chiropractic management of a 5-year-old boy with urinary and bowel incontinence.

Clinical Features:

A 5-year-old boy presented with the primary symptoms of a complete lack of bowel and bladder control with prior surgical correction for lumbar meningocele, spinal lipoma, and tethered spinal cord. Examination revealed spinal and pelvic dysfunction.

Intervention and Outcome:

Chiropractic treatment methods included using the Activator adjusting instrument and shortwave diathermy to the lumbar spine and sacrum. A total of 5 treatments were initially provided over a period of 4 weeks. After the initial treatment period, he was able to maintain satisfactory control of his bladder and bowel, day and night, for a period of approximately 6 months. A second course of treatments was initiated approximately 6 months later because of a recurrence of bladder and bowel incontinence. Four additional treatments were provided over a period of 4 weeks. This second course of treatment reestablished satisfactory control of bladder and bowel function.

Conclusion:

For this patient, chiropractic care was successful in establishing satisfactory bladder and bowel control.


J Chiropr Med. 2010 Mar;9(1):28-31. [PMID:21629396]

Author information: Kamrath KR. Chiropractor, Private Practice, Hutchinson, MN 55350.


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Abstract

Objective:

To describe the results obtained in three women with breech presentations (In-Utero Constraint) who experienced a turning of the fetus using the Activator Adjusting Instrument (AAI) in conjunction with the Webster’s Protocol.

Clinical Features:

Three women presented to the author’s office specifically for reduction of In Utero Constraint and were found to have subluxations consistent with the Webster analysis and protocol. Interventions and

Outcomes:

Webster’s Technique was administered with the sacral component completed using the Activator adjusting instrument. Each fetus successfully turned within 4 visits. Of the three, two went on to have normal vaginal deliveries while one developed other complications during delivery and required an emergency C-section.

Conclusion:

The Activator Adjusting Instrument was used successfully in these cases to reduce the posterior sacral subluxation component of the Webster In-Utero Constraint Technique.


Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health – Chiropractic ~ Volume 2010 ~ Issue 1 ~ Pages 18-21

Author information: Drew Rubin, BS, DC, CCSP, DACCP. Private Practice of Chiropractic, Smyrna, GA. Adjunct Faculty, Life University, Marietta, GA.


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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this case report is to describe the response to chiropractic care of a pediatric patient with complaints of neck pain; headaches; and hand, leg, and foot pain after head trauma and the reports of changes in the patient’s history of chronic fatigue, vomiting, and coughing.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

A 6-year-old girl was pushed into a playground slide, hitting her head and resulting in acute complaints of her “neck and brain hurting” and hand, foot, and occasional leg pain. In addition, the patient had a several-year history of unexplained fatigue, vomiting, and coughing spells. She had a neck pain disability index of 17.8%; left lateral and rotational head tilt; cervical antalgic lean; loss of cervical range of motion; anterior cervical translation; and spasm, tenderness, trigger points, and edema along the cervical and thoracic spine.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:

The patient was cared for using Activator Methods protocol. After the fifth treatment, all the patient’s symptoms dissipated, with a complete return to normal activity and spinal stability after 9 treatments. At 19 weeks, her spine continued to be asymptomatic; and her neck disability index was 0%.

CONCLUSION:

This case demonstrated that the Activator Method of chiropractic care had a beneficial effect for this pediatric patient.


J Chiropr Med. 2009 Sep;8(3):131-6. [PMID:19703669]

Author information: Roberts J, Wolfe T. HealthQuest Chiropractic, Farmington, ME 04938.


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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this case report was to describe the observation of the manipulation of the fourth rib followed by the reproducible, rapid return of heart rate to normal in a patient with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

A male patient had paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. He was evaluated using standard methods of palpation. He was followed over a 6-year period.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:

The patient was treated during episodes of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) with instrument-assisted manipulation of the fourth rib without treatment of any other segments. Tachycardia was eliminated after rib manipulation within less than 2 minutes. Over a 6-year period, effective control of episodes of SVT was consistently achieved associated with manipulation of the fourth rib.

CONCLUSIONS:

This case study is suggestive of a relationship between SVT and misalignment of the fourth rib. Controlled studies are necessary to validate this observation.


J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2008 Jun;31(5):389-91. [PMID:18558281]

Author information: Julian MR. Private practice, Reston, VA 20191, USA.

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Abstract

In this case, a 23-month old female with  chronic otitis media who has undergone traditional medical treatment  with no relief of symptoms finds sustained improvement with chiropractic  care. A mechanism for the etiology of chronic otitis media is  suggested.


Chiropr. 1992; 8(2):38-9.

Author information: Phillips NJ. Private practice of chiropractic, Galion, OH, USA.

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Excerpt

As I start to put pen to paper so to speak, I  cannot help but reflect on the chain of events which brought me to this crucial momentous period in my life where something I am about to write  will actually be published (hopefully).

Rest assured that I have never in the past, nor will ever in  the future, delude myself with the Idea that I am an author, even if I  use the term in the loosest meaning of the word, however there are  things which I have learned in my eight years of practice plus some techniques which evolved from a blending together of various techniques  and knowledge that the time has come to at least share some of this  knowledge with those of you who are receptive to new Ideas.

Early in December, 1981. Dr. Peter Bull, our devoted editor, and myself traveled to North Queensland to give a seminar based on X-Ray  Diagnosis, Sacro-Occipital Technique (S.O.T.) and a composite of  X-Ray/S.O.T. Diagnosis featuring a Central Gravity Line superimposed on  X-Ray films. Peter put the films together from category 1, 2 and 3  standing analysis criteria which I supplied. The first time that I saw  the films was during our composite presentation. Peter showed the films, I then gave a diagnosis using S.O.T. criteria and the adjustment required. The result was 99% accurate which not only pleased the seminar participants, but validate S.O.T. category analysis and impressed an  otherwise pessimistic Editor. And in the words of the Good Book “it came  to pass” that on the flight home, Peter asked me to do I series of  articles on my approach to S.O.T., especially the two versions of a  category 2 or sacroiliac problems.

Time however has not permitted that article to take shape, but  during the social of 13th February, I mentioned my technique for Torticollis to Lindsay Collins and Peter Bull and after a few more glasses of Riesling, I agreed to whip up an article on this particular technique using the Activator.

In future articles, I shall describe the whole approach of  S.O.T. including the two Category 2′s, where sacral balancing cranial  fits into the procedures and why the Deerfield Test is not conclusive re  pelvic/cervical analysis.

The activator technique for Torticollis is actually a  combination of the Dr.’s Fuhr and Lee Activator system and an Atlas analysis of the Sacro-Occipital Technique.

As you are all aware, or you should be, and rest assured if you  are not you will be before long, the acute Torticollis is not an easily  handled patient, the pain and muscle guarding make it almost if not  totally impossible to adjust the patient manually and while some  traction techniques are helpful, nothing can compare with the ease of  correction that the Activator can achieve with very little effort on the  part of the practitioner and absolutely no distress or discomfort to  the patient.

I always remember the words of Dr. Fuhr when he visited  Australia in 1974/75 “that the main fault of a chiropractors today is over adjusting.”


Chiropr J Aust. 1982; 2: 13-14.

Author information: Henningham M.

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