Archive for category Leg Length Inequality/Analysis

Abstract

The interexaminer reliability of relative  leg-length evaluation was studied on a sample of 30 subjects by  examiners. Prone leg length was examined categorically, whether heels  were even or whether there was a relative shortness to either side.  Relative leg-length differences were estimated by using a ruler.  Concordance was computed using Kappa and intra-class correlation  coefficients. The Kappa statistic yielded “fair” to “good” concordance  (ranges: 0.31-0.75) among the 6 combinations of examiner pairs. The  results support the reliability of observing and measuring relative leg-  length inequality in the prone position, and are intended to establish a  baseline for future investigation.


Chiropr Tech 1989; 1(1):13-8.

Author information: Fuhr AW, Osterbauer PJ. Activator Methods, Inc. Phoenix, AZ 85060.

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Abstract

The Derifield-Thompson test for leg length inequality (LLI) is commonly used by chiropractors to assess a need for adjustment and to evaluate the results of adjustment. The two previous studies testing the reliability of the technique reported conflicting results. This study had two objectives: to demonstrate inter- and intraobserver reliability in detecting a LLI as little as 3 mm; and to document what effect Pierce-Stillwagon cervical adjusting has on a functional LLI. Twenty-six subjects walked into five successive examining rooms where a Derifield leg check was performed, including an estimate of the millimeters of difference in leg lengths. The subjects then entered a treatment room where they were randomly given no treatment, cervical adjusting, or gluteal massage. This process continued for 5 cycles. This study demonstrated that clinicians could reliably measure a LLI to less than 3 mm (both inter- and intraobserver), and also detect a change in LLI when the head was rotated. Neither cervical adjustment nor gluteal massage produced a significant change in observed LLI.


J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1988 Oct;11(5):396-9. [PMID:3235927]

Author information: Shambaugh P, Sclafani L, Fanselow D. New York Chiropractic College Research Division, Glen Head , NY 11545.

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Abstract

The phenomenon of “short leg” has long been used and debated clinically. A uniquely chiropractic measurement technique was not studied in any of the few studies of reliability of measurement which have been reported. An inter- and intra-examiner reliability study was therefore performed to validate a prone leg length-differential test. Naive students (n = 40) were called, in random order, into three adjacent examining rooms where three experienced chiropractic clinicians measured differential leg lengths. Using standard placement a tape measure was read to the nearest mm to detect inequalities at the shoe-sole interface. The leg length differences were recorded, for both the straight and flexed legs prone positions, twice by each of the three clinicians. Intraclass correlations were significant for the two independent readings for all three examiners, indicating high reliability of the test. Good agreement among examiners was indicated as well by significant intraclass correlation in two of the three possible examiner combinations. These results argue strongly for the reality of the leg length inequality phenomenon and also that it can be reliably measured.


J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1983 Jun;6(2):61-6. [PMID: 6619669]

Author information: DeBoer KF, Harmon RO Jr, Savoie S, Tuttle CD.

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